supervisory skills

With Supervisory Skills Questionnaire Fourth Edition! Supervisors are a vital cog in the wheel of organizational success. So start the wheels turning with the Supervisory Skills Questionnaire, the training solution that gets supervisors quickly up to speed and ready for performance. It’s the tool thousands of trainers have relied upon for supervisory skills training and now the fourth edition has just arrived with a fresh design and numerous enhancements. From the fully revised, full-color facilitator guide and participant workbook to the half-day workshop,  new online assessments and 180° peer feedback, skill-development activities, and more, the Supervisory Skills Questionnaire offers a, Read More

Transitioning into a management position requires a shift in priorities, where relationship building and communication become central. It’s not always easy to make this transition, especially if one’s technical skill set is something he values highly; but, as with any shift in responsibilities, guiding principles can be derived from the organization’s values and goals – translated into behaviors within a job description that contribute to organizational success. BUT, what happens when these values and goals are either not clearly communicated, or not consistently followed by every stakeholder? Organizational trust is a major vital sign of any organization, and needs to, Read More

A Guest-Post from Lou Russell President and CEO of Russell Martin & Associates and author of Rocket, Project Management for Trainers, Leadership Training, and 10 Steps to Successful Project Management. .  .  .  .  . “The project manager is the linchpin in the horizontal/vertical organizations we’re creating.” – William Dauphinais Imagine you are in a room with 100 people. Take a moment and think about how you and a team of four other people would gather as many signatures as possible (one per person max) on a single sheet of paper in two minutes. This exercise would demonstrate some basic, Read More

When employees become supervisors, just as with any time their position within a workflow changes, they need to put a new set of skills to use. Regardless of their technical expertise, all supervisors need a specific set of soft skills to fill their role successfully.  As a supervisor, they are a translator, a communicator, a planner, and a coach.  They are accountable to the organization they work for, the employees they supervise, and the other groups and individuals involved in the work their team puts out. For their organization, supervisors serve as a translator – they create actionable plans based, Read More

Managing employees is a true feat of soft skills.  Communication, personality style, leadership, and  project and performance management are all put to the test on a daily basis. Sometimes, the employees you manage might seem like they’re on another planet, even when they’re sitting right in front of you.  So, what if they’re in another building?  Another city?  Another country?  Actually ON another planet?  It happens. When employees are discreetly distributed, the manager’s position becomes more important and requires a broader skill set.  The manager may be the only link between employees – the one to set schedules, allocate resources,, Read More

It’s not always apparent when one of your coaches is out of shape.  Glamour muscles might be hiding a bad habit, or a marshmallowy exterior might conceal a rock.  Sometimes you just need to take a closer look. Everyone benefits from the coaching process.  Employees improve their skills, learn new things, and feel better about their place in an organization.  Coaches improve their relationships with teammates and benefit from improved employee performance.  And organizations flourish with highly skilled employees that are working together towards a common goal. Make sure your team has all of these advantages by keeping your coaches, Read More

The actual scope of a job is more than the tasks we perform every day.  Especially for those of us whose positions center on interpersonal relationships, there are added responsibilities that are less tangible.  Sometimes, these responsibilities can be more important than our daily tasks – and they require soft skills. In a recent study of nurse managers, 80 percent reported that they seek new hires with informatics, communication, and leadership skills.  In the same study, 98 percent of practicing nurses reported a desire for more education and training in these areas.  Of this new data, Sheryl Sommer, director of, Read More

InsideHRDQ Blog

  Subscribe Now!

Receive notifications of new posts by email.

Close