HRDQ Style Model

The HRDQ Style Model is an accurate and accessible model of Personality Style, based on an individual’s levels of assertiveness and expressiveness.  It defines four styles (Direct, Spirited, Systematic, and Considerate), that describe sets of natural behavioral tendencies. These styles reflect all aspects of our behavior and they represent both effective and ineffective choices.  Once we’ve developed an appropriate awareness of our own behaviors, we can resolve to choose more effective actions.  We can start by finding out which personality style we exhibit. The HRDQ Style Series offers eight personality assessments that target different aspects of work-life.  By examining some, Read More

By Martin Delahoussaye, Vice President, Publishing, HRDQ Ask anyone in your organization and I bet they can easily identify a coworker they feel they work well with and another with whom they find, let’s say, ‘challenging’. Some people seem to click and others seem to clash. The reasoning behind this has a lot to do with personality style. Some style combinations are more complementary than others. If you want the people in your organization to make meaningful improvements to their relationships, there is no better place to start than personality style. It’s square one for interpersonal skills development, and it’s, Read More

Happy New Year, Everybody!  Have you made your resolution yet?  Neither have I.  Let’s do it together – and make it count. The HRDQ Style Model is an accurate and accessible model of Personality Style, based on an individual’s levels of assertiveness and expressiveness.  It defines four styles (Direct, Spirited, Systematic, and Considerate), that describe sets of natural behavioral tendencies. Because these styles reflect all aspects of our behavior, they represent both effective and ineffective choices.  Once we’ve developed an appropriate awareness of our own behaviors, we can resolve to choose more effective actions.  We can start by finding out, Read More

For literally thousands of years, people have been asking the question, “What’s the deal with me?” In Classical times, “what we are” was the same thing as “who we are.”  The physical body was fundamentally connected to the “I” (the personality) and the deed/action.  Classical physician Hippocrates noted signs from the body that related to the disposition and personality.  He called these physical/behavioral pairings the Four Humors, and related each to an element of nature (fire, water, wind, earth): Classical notions of ideal forms (developed by Hippocrates’ contemporary, Plato) found resurgence during the modernist period.  People had, in the face, Read More

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